Agenda

Monday, May 13th - Conference Day 1

7:30am to 8:15am
Networking Breakfast
Check-in at registration outside the exhibition area and enjoy a hot breakfast before sessions commence.
Location:
Presidential Ballroom
8:15am to 9:30am
Keynote Speaker
8:15 AM to 8:30 AM Opening remarks 
8:30 AM to 9:30 AM Keynote presentation 
Location: Congressional Room
9:30am to 9:45am
Networking Break
Enjoy some refreshments and networking with our vendors and industry leaders.
Location: Presidential Ballroom
9:45am to Noon
Session One
Location  
Congressional Room AES: RAS Energy Optimization – Planning, Design, Sustainability
Chairs: Maddi Badiola, Ph.D. and Paul Hundley
RAS energy costs and energy system operations and maintenance (O&M) costs are right behind feed and labor as key factors in the cost of production – the cost to produce fish. These “systems” have a significant environmental footprint and should be selected to minimize energy use as well as the O&M burden on the RAS enterprise. This session provides a roadmap for RAS energy system optimization.

Presenters

  • Steven Hall, Mass Balance Energy Design
  • Gene Ashe, Pump Selection and Application Design
  • Grant Shannon, Oxygen Generators – VSA vs PSA vs LOX
  • Philip Nickerson, Applied Energy Recovery Design – Air and Water
  • Heidi Kyvik, Optimized Design for Large Production
  • John Holder, Effective Aquaculture, Trying to Do it the Right Way, the RASWay
Senate Room Shrimp production in RAS
Chairs: Andrew Ray, Ph.D. and Nyan Taw
This session will cover a variety of topics related to growing shrimp in RAS. Some of the issues being explored include shrimp nutrition, system design and management, biofloc technology, indoor systems, year-round production, and greenhouse production. Some of the world's leading shrimp aquaculture researchers will be presenting here and you won't want to miss it.

Presenters

  • Zach Taylor
  • Leo Fleckenstein
  • Misael Rosales
  • Thomas Tierney
Federal Room A The Practical Economic Realities of RAS 
Chairs: Carole Engle, Ph.D. and Jonathan Van Senten, Ph.D.
Research has shown clearly that fish and shrimp can be grown in RAS. However, the persistent question continues to be whether RAS can produce fish or shrimp profitably, particularly in light of the many failures of RAS businesses. This session will begin with a brief overview of economic fundamentals related to RAS, but will focus primarily on the practical business experience shared by RAS commercial producers of tilapia, Branzino, and shrimp.

Presenters

  • Jim Franklin, Econonmics of Recirculating Aquaculture Systems
  • Eric Perderson, Key RAS Determinants: Species, Scale and Channel to Market
  • Karlanea Brown, Recirculation Shrimp Farm in Indiana
12:00pm to 1:30pm
Networking Lunch
Join us for a buffet lunch and networking. 
Location: Presidential Ballroom
1:30pm to 3:00pm
Session Two
Location  
Congressional Room  AES: Engineering Innovations - The path to commercial success 
Chair: Japp Van Rijn, Ph.D.

The rapid expansion of recirculating aquaculture systems, both in terms of number and size of installations, poses many new challenges for the RAS industry. These challenges, related to the development of economically viable and environmentally sustainable systems for production of either freshwater or marine fish, require close cooperation between commercial and academic activities. In this AES- sponsored session, innovative technologies, those already implemented in commercial RAS or those still under development, will be presented.
Senate Room Marine RAS
Chair: Yonathan Zohar, Ph.D.
Federal Room A Health and disease in RAS
ChairStephen Smith, DVM, Ph.D
3:00pm to 3:30pm
Networking break
Enjoy some refreshments and networking with our vendors and industry leaders.
Location: Presidential Ballroom
3:30pm to 5:00pm
Session Two Continued
Location  
Congressional Room  AES: Engineering Innovations - The path to commercial success 
Chair: Japp Van Rijn, Ph.D. 

The rapid expansion of recirculating aquaculture systems, both in terms of number and size of installations, poses many new challenges for the RAS industry. These challenges, related to the development of economically viable and environmentally sustainable systems for production of either freshwater or marine fish, require close cooperation between commercial and academic activities. In this AES- sponsored session, innovative technologies, those already implemented in commercial RAS or those still under development, will be presented.
Senate Room Marine RAS
Chair: Yonathan Zohar, Ph.D.
Federal Room A Health and disease in RAS
Chair: Stephen Smith, DVM, Ph.D
5:00pm to 7:00pm
Cocktail Reception
Join us for some appetizers and cocktails. Stay tuned for updates!


Tuesday, May 14: Conference Part 2

7:30am : 8:30am
Networking breakfast
Enjoy breakfast in the exhibition area before sessions commence.
Location: Presidential Ballroom
8:30am to 10:00am
Session Three
Location  
Congressional Room  Session TBC 
Senate Room Aquaponics
Chairs: Amy Riedel-Stone and Huy Tran

Aquaponic systems are becoming increasingly popular, and more farms are finding innovative ways to produce more than one crop in their RAS. Aquaponics is a recirculating aquaculture system that incorporates the production of plants without soil. In typical recirculating aquaculture systems, the goal is to produce large quantities of aquatic biomass in small amounts of space and small volumes of water. In such a system, waste products can accumulate if not physically removed or otherwise filtered via mechanical or biological means. The organic buildup and metabolic by-products can be re-used in an aquaponic system by a secondary crop: plants. Plants can grow rapidly with dissolved nutrients that are excreted directly by the aquatic species or generated from the microbial breakdown of the animal waste by the various species of bacteria in the system. With very little daily water exchange in RAS, dissolved nutrients accumulate in concentrations similar to those in hydroponic nutrient solutions. These dissolved waste nutrients are taken up by the plants, reducing wastewater discharge and allowing for more efficient use of the fish feed and water.
Federal Room A Feeds and feed management in RAS 
Chairs
Craig Browdy, Ph.D. and Scott Snyder

Feeds and feed management are the cornerstone of profitable production of fish and shrimp in RAS. Feeds nourish the target crop and represent the primary operating cost. Feed inputs directly and indirectly drive water quality and crop health. This session focuses on advancements in feed formulation, manufacturing and delivery to support successful RAS crops.
10:00am to 10:30am
Networking Break
Enjoy some refreshments and networking with our vendors and industry leaders.
Location: Presidential Ballroom
10:30am to Noon
Session Three Continued
Location  
Congressional Room  Session TBC

Senate Room Aquaponics 
Chairs: Amy Riedel-Stone and Hyun Tran

Aquaponic systems are becoming increasingly popular, and more farms are finding innovative ways to produce more than one crop in their RAS. Aquaponic systems are recirculating aquaculture systems that incorporate the production of plants without soil. In typical recirculating aquaculture systems, the goal is to produce large quantities of aquatic biomass in small amounts of space and small volumes of water. In such a system, waste products can accumulate if not physically removed or otherwise filtered via mechanical or biological means. The organic buildup and metabolic byproducts can be reused in aquaponic system by a secondary crop; plants. Plants can grow rapidly with dissolved nutrients that are excreted directly by the aquatic species or generated from the microbial breakdown of the animal waste by the various species of bacteria in the system. In RAS with very little daily water exchange, dissolved nutrients accumulate in concentrations similar to those in hydroponic nutrient solutions. These dissolved waste nutrients are taken up by the plants, reducing wastewater discharge and allowing for more efficient use of the fish feed and water.
Federal Room A Feeds and feed management in RAS
ChairsCraig Browdy, Ph.D. and Scott Snyder

Feeds and feed management are the cornerstone of profitable production of fish and shrimp in RAS. Feeds nourish the target crop and represent the primary operating cost. Feed inputs directly and indirectly drive water quality and crop health. This session focuses on advancements in feed formulation, manufacturing and delivery to support successful RAS crops.
12:00pm - 1:30pm
Networking Lunch
Join us for a buffet lunch and networking.
Location: Presidential Ballroom
1:30pm to 3:00pm
Session Four
Location  
Congressional Room  Advances in hatchery/live feeds technologies
Chair: Michael Schwarz, Ph.D.

Commercial advancement of intensive RAS, high-value species, as well as offshore aquaculture production are all critically reliant upon the consistent availability of high quality, high-health, and economical juveniles. This session expounds upon the current global status of advances in hatchery RAS, with emphasis on live feeds, live feeds replacements, as well as systems and production technologies. This session will also engage the emerging field of microbiomes within the RAS hatchery complex.
Senate Room Freshwater Institute Research Update: A Holistic Approach to Fish Production in RAS 
Chair: John Davidson
RAS operations must employ personnel with wide-ranging expertise and must utilize effective technologies that support a range of processes including: fish production, water treatment, water chemistry, waste treatment, harvesting/processing, and more. As such, The Conservation Fund’s Freshwater Institute (FI) research team works comprehensively across a range of scientific disciplines to provide practical information to RAS fish farmers and stakeholders. Their research scope includes: RAS engineering and technology, fish health and biological performance, development of standard operating procedures and fish husbandry techniques, optimization of fish culture environment through water chemistry analytics, aquafeeds research, innovative wastewater treatment, and at the end of the cycle - fillet and product quality research. This session will cover the wide spectrum of important RAS topics currently being investigated by the Freshwater Institute team.

Presenters 
  • Natalie Redman, Evaluating methods for carbon dioxide measurement in freshwater
  • Curtis Crouse, Evaluating rainbow trout health and performance when feeding diets with different levels of astaxanthin and zinc
  • Christine Lepine, Woodchip bioreactors for treating RAS wastewater: Evaluating performance, economic feasibility, and environmental impact
  • John Davidson, Fillet and product quality research at TCFFI: Off-flavor remediation, harvest techniques, and humane slaughter
  • Laura Bailey, Comparative economics of land-based recirculation aquaculture systems
Federal Room A Investor Forum (& Government Panel)
Chair: David Kuhn, Ph.D.

This session will provide information on what types of projects investors are interested in funding as well as how to engage with aquaculturists experts, economic development groups, designers, engineers, marketing specialists, equipment suppliers, and contractors to develop and implement a successful RAS project.
3:00pm to 3:30pm
Networking Break
Enjoy some refreshments and networking with our vendors and industry leaders.
Location:
Presidential Ballroom
3:30pm to 5:00pm
Session Four Continued
Location  
Congressional Room  Advances in hatchery/live feeds technologies
Chair: Michael Schwarz, Ph.D.

Commercial advancement of intensive RAS, high-value species, as well as offshore aquaculture production are all critically reliant upon the consistent availability of high quality, high-health, and economical juveniles. This session expounds upon the current global status of advances in hatchery RAS, with emphasis on live feeds, live feeds replacements, as well as systems and production technologies. This session will also engage the emerging field of microbiomes within the RAS hatchery complex.
Senate Room Freshwater Institute Research Update: A Holistic Approach to Fish Production in RAS 
Chair: John Davidson
RAS operations must employ personnel with wide-ranging expertise and must utilize effective technologies that support a range of processes including: fish production, water treatment, water chemistry, waste treatment, harvesting/processing, and more. As such, The Conservation Fund’s Freshwater Institute (FI) research team works comprehensively across a range of scientific disciplines to provide practical information to RAS fish farmers and stakeholders. Their research scope includes: RAS engineering and technology, fish health and biological performance, development of standard operating procedures and fish husbandry techniques, optimization of fish culture environment through water chemistry analytics, aquafeeds research, innovative wastewater treatment, and at the end of the cycle - fillet and product quality research. This session will cover the wide spectrum of important RAS topics currently being investigated by the Freshwater Institute team.

Presenters
  • Natalie Redman, Evaluating methods for carbon dioxide measurement in freshwater
  • Curtis Crouse, Evaluating rainbow trout health and performance when feeding diets with different levels of astaxanthin and zinc
  • Christine Lepine, Woodchip bioreactors for treating RAS wastewater: Evaluating performance, economic feasibility, and environmental impact
  • John Davidson, Fillet and product quality research at TCFFI: Off-flavor remediation, harvest techniques, and humane slaughter
  • Laura Bailey, Comparative economics of land-based recirculation aquaculture systems
 Federal Room A Investor Forum (& Government Panel)
Chair: David Kuhn, Ph.D.

This session will provide information on the types of projects investors are interested in funding, as well as on engaging aquaculture experts, economic development groups, designers, engineers, marketing specialists, equipment suppliers, and contractors to develop and implement a successful RAS project.
5:00pm
Closing Remarks

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